outrageous dresses

Haute couture.

Otherwise known as high fashion and dressmaking at its finest. It’s a term so exclusive that it’s protected by law and defined by the Chambre de commerce et d’industrie de Paris. It even has a list of official members (kind of like the secret society in A Series of Unfortunate Events…or the KKK). When I look at collections by Gaultier or Dior, I immediately feel like I’m in a time period that never existed. There can never be too much lace, feathers, glitter, mesh, spandex, velvet, or tulle, and on the runway higher doses of outrageousness is better applauded. I can’t help but feel inspired, horrified, amused, shocked, embarrassed, and most of all enraptured when I see those human twigs doing their walk, decked out in what appears to be glorified window curtains, sexified space gear, armadillo heels, parts of an ostrich and kimonos on crack. I love it!

That got me thinking. Most of these dresses are so outrageous that they start to resemble all kinds of things – animals, plants, food, buildings, religious icons, everyday objects and even Pokemon characters. I flipped through a bunch of collections by McQueen, John Galliano, Dior, Agatha Ruiz de la Prada, Jean Paul Gaultier, Karl Lagerfeld, Armani PrivĂ©…and in my head I started to match each dress to whatever came to mind. It kind of exploded into a fun project as you can see:

And of course, who can forget one of Lady Gaga’s many scandalous ensembles…

There you go! 50 outrageous dresses (and comparisons) that took three days to put together. This was an addicting project. I could go on forever doing this but then there would never be a blog entry :)

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14 thoughts on “outrageous dresses

  1. Emily says:

    Amazing and fantastic collection!! You are incredibly creative and insightful. :)

  2. I love it!! Fashion has always been one of those things that I think it looks so amazing, but I could never actually make anything. My sewing skills and comprehension sucks. It’s cool how they draw inspiration from everything around them.

    What is also cool is looking at japanese street fashion, they are very creative when it comes to doing homemade stuff.

  3. Brit says:

    Most of these of are attempts at recreating the beauty of God’s artwork.

  4. Lydia says:

    The teapot one is actually very pretty. Everything else… uhhh…. not so much.

    BTW, I just discovered ‘The Thought Pantry’ and I’m enraptured! I love it!

  5. Raul says:

    I think you just dissected the brain of 50 different fashion designers. You know if you think about it, If you take what you just did but in reverse, you could probably be getting paid to travel around the world for inspiration like the designers of these usually dresses do. I saw a show once about rug designers. Its all they do. They just bounce around the globe looking at cool textures & colors then they take that & put it in rug form.

  6. What a brilliant collection! All of the dresses brought to mind the objects you put beside them, and I particularly enjoyed the clock (I thought that was a great represenation!)

  7. kuki says:

    AWESOME!!!! Beautifully made!!

  8. […] Haute couture. Otherwise known as high fashion and dressmaking at its finest. It's a term so exclusive that it's protected by law and defined by the Chambre de commerce et d'industrie de Paris. It even has a list of official members (kind of like the secret society in A Series of Unfortunate Events…or the KKK). When I look at collections by Gaultier or Dior, I immediately feel like I'm in a time period that never existed. There can never be too … Read More […]

  9. unsparetreat says:

    That’s cool, just the kind of coffee table book thats a feast for the eyes when you want a big hit of “fantastic! Wish I had one on my table to enrapture my friends.

  10. John A. says:

    Hello. I see you have used my Red-Yellow-Green Peppers photo. You forgot to include a link, however.
    http://fineartamerica.com/featured/red-yellow-green-peppers-john-ayo.html

    I have been finding others using my photos without asking permission as well. When they use them commercially I ask them to stop. For an apparent editorial use like you have here I am satisfied with a credit and link.

    Thanks.

  11. John A. says:

    BTW – If you did do that coffee table book suggested above, that would be a very different situation.

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